What Goodness Knows: Ed Simon’s “Furnace of this World; or, 36 Observations About Goodness”

When Mark Twain's Huck decides to help Jim, an illegal immigrant of his time, a runaway slave, Huck believes he'll go to hell for his goodness. Huck knows that by helping Jim escape he'll be breaking the law. He'll bring the wrath of local public opinion so forcefully down upon his head, this time it'll … Continue reading What Goodness Knows: Ed Simon’s “Furnace of this World; or, 36 Observations About Goodness”

On Setting and Narration

In the middle of Adam Gopnik’s explanation of Lawrence Buell’s reading preferences informed by historical setting (New Yorker, “Go Giants: A new survey of the Great American Novel,” 21 Apr, 104), there’s an ambiguity, whether caused by Buell, Adam Gopnik, or both, I’m not sure, but Gopnik says Buell thinks Huck helping Jim escape is … Continue reading On Setting and Narration

Waltzing with a Loon to the Tune of a Whippoorwill

Henry's loon waltzed into the room laughing laughing laughing at the phony moon rising over the pond-like screen laughing at Henry, at me, and at you too who scorned the whippoorwilled who loon-waltzed our way across the fall season who tweeted twitted twisted and tallyhoed on but what stilled the waters the antithesis of laughter … Continue reading Waltzing with a Loon to the Tune of a Whippoorwill